Free for 90 days: Sign up now and get 90 days managed free after your first deposit. See offer details

<title>Dismiss</title>
Compensation

5 Financial Steps To Take After Getting A Raise

When you get a raise at work, consider how you can maximize your earnings to identify new financial opportunities.

Articles by Andrew Westlin, CFP®

By Andrew Westlin
Financial Planner, Betterment  |  Published: July 10, 2019

Being proactive about what you do with your new raise could set you up for more financial success and fulfillment.

Enjoy the new influx of cash, but consider these 5 tips to help meet your financial goals.

If you’ve recently received a raise, congratulations! You worked many long hours to deserve this, and now your hard work has paid off.

Whether this pay increase was expected or whether it was a complete surprise, you may have many thoughts running through your mind, including calling your spouse or your Mom, deciding what restaurant you are dining at for a celebration, or how your new salary will give you more freedom to take that vacation you’ve been wanting to go on.

While you should be excited, it’s important to take a step back to reassess your new pay and how it impacts your financial situation. Without doing so, you might find that your raise is more harmful than when you were making less money. To avoid having “raise-regret”, consider these five tips.

5 Things To Do After Receiving A Raise

1. Understand your new salary.

While you deserve to celebrate, you may want to hold off on making any large purchases that were unplanned and not saved for with your new cash flow. Unlike a bonus, where you receive a lump sum, your raise is going to be broken out across all pay periods.

Additionally, your raise is going to be stated as an increase to your gross pay. In other words, if you receive a $5,000 annual raise, that does not mean that you are pocketing $5,000 over the course of the next year because we have to pay taxes.

If you aren’t familiar with the amount of taxes you pay, it could be worthwhile to check your last few pay stubs to determine how much was going to taxes versus how much you were keeping.

Also note that depending on the amount of your raise and the time of year, it may push you into a higher tax bracket. You may want to speak with your Human Resources and Payroll departments to discuss your tax withholding, as well as an accountant or qualified tax professional to see how your increased earnings could impact your personal tax situation.

2. Increase your retirement savings.

If your employer offers a 401(k) plan and matches your contributions, you should consider contributing at least enough to get the full match amount. Granted that you were already doing so, or that your employer does not offer a match, increasing your retirement savings may still be a great option.

And, for those who are comfortable with their lifestyle prior to receiving a raise and don’t plan to make any changes, you can supercharge your raise by increasing your savings rate at an equivalent rate to your bonus.

Determining how much you need to save for retirement will depend on several factors. Betterment offers a retirement tool that can provide guidance on not only how much you should save, but the optimal accounts for you to do so based on your situation.

3. Establish, or revisit, your emergency fund.

Having an emergency fund is one of the most important financial savings goals, as it can help ensure a level of financial security for yourself and your family. An adequate emergency fund will allow you to cover truly large and unexpected expenses, and can also cover your costs if you end up losing your job. It can even provide financial freedom in the case that you want to try your hand at a new career.

Typically, Betterment advises that your emergency fund should cover three to six months worth of expenses. If you didn’t have one prior to your raise, now would be a great time to start. If you already have an emergency fund, you may need to reevaluate the amount needed if your spending does increase.

4. Pay off debt.

If you have any debt, especially high interest debt, you may choose to use this new capital to pay off some of your loans.

Let’s assume that you are a single taxpayer, live in a state with no state income tax, and at the start of 2019 your pay went from $60,000 to $65,000. Assuming you don’t itemize, that would place you squarely in the 22% Federal tax bracket. If you get paid twice per month (24 times per year), your net paycheck would go from $1,950 to $2,112, an increase of $162.

If you have student loans of $50,000 at 7% interest that were to be paid over 10 years, your minimum monthly payment would be about $580.

Increasing your monthly payment by $162 would allow you to pay off your loans almost three years faster, and also help you save almost $6,000 in interest payments!

5. Invest in yourself.

Okay, let’s say you’re already on track with your retirement goals, have an emergency fund, and paid off your debt. What do you do then?

Investing in yourself can have immense value. And the best part is, it can be done in many ways. Whether that’s taking a vacation to reset your mind after months of diligent work, taking a class to enhance your skills or learn a new one, or even making a material purchase that you feel will better your quality of life, investing in yourself can be a great way to reap the benefits of your hard earned work.

If you plan on spending this extra money, just make sure that it’s within your means—don’t fall victim to lifestyle creep.

Inherently, you may be a saver by nature. While it’s important to set goals, you may not have a specific goal for these additional savings. By investing additional cash flow in a well-diversified portfolio, you can help to create an even larger raise for yourself at some point down the line. For example, using a taxable investment account will give you more flexibility as to how and when these savings can be used.

Recommended Content

View All Resources
Understanding Your Total Compensation Package

Understanding Your Total Compensation Package

While interviewing, potential candidates should be empowered to evaluate whether a company is a good fit for their financial and cultural needs, as well as vice versa. Here are some factors you should consider when making your decision.

5 Financial Steps To Take After Getting A Raise

5 Financial Steps To Take After Getting A Raise

When you get a raise at work, consider how you can maximize your earnings to identify new financial opportunities.

Frequently Asked Questions about Betterment

Frequently Asked Questions about Betterment

Just starting out exploring Betterment? These are the frequently asked questions that help people find their way.

Explore your first goal

Safety Net

This is a great place to start—an emergency fund for life's unplanned hiccups. A safety net is a conservative portfolio.

Retirement

Whether it's a long way off or just around the corner, we'll help you save for the retirement you deserve.

General Investing

If you want to invest and build wealth over time, then this is the goal for you. This is an excellent goal type for unknown future needs or money you plan to pass to future generations.

Smart Saver

You could earn 20X more than a typical savings account with our low-risk investing account for your extra cash.

<title>Close</title>

Search our site

For more information and disclosures about the Betterment Resource Center, click here. | See our contributors.