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CEO Jon Stein talks about fiduciary duty of brokers

Our friends over at Free From Broke posted an article this morning written by our CEO, Jon Stein. In the article, Jon argues…

Articles by Alan Norton

By Alan Norton
  |  Published: March 23, 2011

Our friends over at Free From Broke posted an article this morning written by our CEO, Jon Stein.

In the article, Jon argues that stock brokers should be legally required to act as fiduciaries:

We think this is a no-brainer: OF COURSE brokers should act in the best interest of their customers – and they should be legally liable if they do not.

Predictably, brokers are against this common-sense approach. In large part, this is because it would cut into their profits.

Go read the full article and let us know what you think.

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